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Dental Clinic for Wind Players: Causes and Cures of Sudden vs. Gradual Embouchure and Playing Problems Due to Neuropathy

 
 

Copyright 2017, Mark Alan Wade

Primary Author: Nemoto, T.
Journal Title: Brass Bulletin
Date Published: 1996
Language: English
Category: Orofacial Disorders
Key Words: teeth wind performance cause treatment embouchure neuropathy musician instrumental
Full Citation: Nemoto, Toshio. Dental Clinic for Wind Players: Causes and Cures of Sudden vs. Gradual Embouchure and Playing Problems Due to Neuropathy. Brass Bulletin 95 (1996): 74-6.
Full Abstract: Excessive pressure and practice can cause a malfunction in facial nerves and fail to send the proper signals to nerves, resulting in an inability to control the embouchure in brass playing. The musical symptom often heard is cracking articulations, though there may be no visible evidence. Bell's Palsy is one type of facial paralysis whose cause is unknown. It is fairly common and, to a great extent, curable with hormone treatment, ultrasound and massage. The least severe stage of interrupting nerve conductivity is called neuropraxia, which can be triggered by circulation disorders and compression of the nerve, both of which can occur in brass playing. On the contrary, pressure on a neurofibril may bring on paralysis, a sudden setback not remedied by rest. Rest, moderation and less mouthpiece pressure are prescribed and most patients resume playing within several months.